Izabel Galliera: Socially Engaged Art After Socialism: Art and Civil Society in Central and Eastern Europe (2017)

17 January 2019, dusan

“Reclaiming public life from the ideologies of both communist regimes and neoliberalism, their projects have harnessed the politically subversive potential of social relations based on trust, reciprocity and solidarity. Drawing on archival material and exclusive interviews, in this book Izabel Galliera traces the development of socially engaged art from the early 1990s to the present in Bulgaria, Hungary and Romania. She demonstrates that, in the early 1990s, projects were primarily created for exhibitions organized and funded by the Soros Centers for Contemporary Art. In the early 2000s, prior to Bulgaria, Hungary and Romania entering into the European Union, EU institutions likewise funded socially-conscious public art in the region. Today, socially engaged art is characterised by the proliferation of independent and often self-funded artists’ initiatives in cities such as Sofia, Bucharest and Budapest.

Focusing on the relationships between art, social capital and civil society, Galliera employs sociological and political theories to reveal that, while social capital is generally considered a mechanism of exclusion in the West, in post-socialist contexts it has been leveraged by artists and curators as a vital means of communication and action.”

Publisher I.B. Tauris, London/New York, 2017
ISBN 9781784537135, 1784537136
xx+361 pages

Review: Denisa Tomkova (ARTMargins, 2018).

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Mutually: Communities of the 1970s and 1980s / Navzájem: Společenství 70. a 80. let, catalogue (2013) [EN/SK/CZ]

28 December 2013, dusan

Catalogue for an exhibition held in March-May 2013 at tranzitdisplay in Prague and The Brno House of Arts, Czech Republic, curated by Barbora Klímová, Daniel Grúň and Filip Cenek.

The selected fragments in this exhibition, borrowed from the archives of Moravian, Slovak, and Hungarian artists, reference different communities within the framework of “unofficial culture” during the period of Czechoslovak normalisation in the 1970s-80s.

Publisher tranzitdisplay, Prague, and The House of Arts, Brno, 2013
44 pages
via Academia.edu

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Sound Exchange: Anthology of Experimental Music Cultures in Central and Eastern Europe 1950-2010 (2012) [English/German]

19 November 2012, dusan

“The long traditions of experimental music cultures in Central and Eastern Europe are diverse and multifaceted, but have been difficult to access until now. With contributions from selected music, media and cultural studies specialists from eight countries, this anthology bundles together elements of unearthing material locally and documents current positions and historical finds by protagonists, as well as musical aesthetic qualities in the history of musical experiments in Central and Eastern Europe. The anthology pursues commonalities and singularities and discusses their relationship with the international history of experimental music.

The often barely known musical and artistic positions portrayed here show a wide stylistic and aesthetic spectrum of electro-acoustic music, composed and improvised music, musical media art and audio art from 60 years of experimental musical culture in the context of decades-long political repression and an atmosphere of increasing openness and international networking following 1989.”

With contributions by Antoni Beksiak, Balázs Kovács, Daiga Mazvērsīte, Gerhard Lock, Hans-Gunter Lock, Māra Traumane, Martin Flašar, Michal Rataj, Miloš Vojtěchovský, Monika Pasiecznik, Pavel Klusák, Slávo Krekovič, Tautvydas Bajarkevicius, Viestarts Gailītis.

Edited by Carsten Seiffarth, Carsten Stabenow, and Golo Föllmer
Publisher PFAU, Saarbrücken, 2012
ISBN 9783897274877, 3897274876
400 pages

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