Studio International, 984: Art & Experimental Music (1976)

31 October 2018, dusan

This special issue of Studio International on art and experimental music features texts by Michael Nyman, Cornelius Cardew, Germano Celant, Gavin Bryars, Brian Eno, Stuart Marshall, Jeffrey Steele, Paul Burwell, and David Toop, and interviews with Steve Reich (Michael Nyman), Tom Phillips (Fred Orton and Gavin Bryars), and Morton Feldman (Gavin Bryars and Fred Orton).

The issue is accompanied by a cassette featuring contributions from Howard Skempton, Christopher Hobbs, Gavin Bryars, John White, Michael Parsons, James Lampard, and Michael Nyman (see page 329).

Editorial assistance: Michael Nyman
Publisher Studio International Journal, London, November-December 1976
xvi+99 pages

PDF (55 MB)
Cassette supplement: Audio Arts 3(2): “Recent English Experimental Music”: Info & MP3s

Pictures to be Read, Poetry to be Seen (1967)

12 October 2018, dusan

“Both an inaugural event in the foundation of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, and as an early marker of its experimental ethos, the MCA’s first formal gallery exhibition, Pictures to be Read/Poetry to be Seen, brought together artists who probed the permeable spaces between pictorial images, linguistic representation, artistic practice and lived experience. As a guiding, yet loose, theme for the exhibition, founding director Jan van der Marck chose works that attempted to break down the medium-specificity of traditional artistic categories. In many instances, this was achieved through a conflation of various codes and signifiers from different modes of linguistic and visual production (like poetics, graphic design, and performance) and the modes of perception they supposedly required (such as reading, seeing and participation).”

Pictures to be Read/Poetry to be Seen featured 71 works created between 1961–67 by artists, including Shusaku Arakawa, Giafranco Baruchello, Mary Bauermeister, George Brecht, Oyvind Fahlström, Ray Johnson, Allan Kaprow, R. B. Kitaj, Alison Knowles, Jim Nutt, Gianni-Emilio Simonetti, and Wolf Vostell.

Curated, with an introductory essay and notes on the artists, by Jan van der Marck
Publisher Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, 1967
[33] pages
via laboratoirefig.fr

Exhibition
WorldCat

PDF (4 MB)

Sally Banes: Greenwich Village 1963: Avant-Garde Performance and the Effervescent Body (1993)

28 July 2017, dusan

“The year was 1963 and from Birmingham to Washington, D.C., from Vietnam to the Kremlin to the Berlin Wall, the world was in the throes of political upheaval and historic change. But that same year, in New York’s Greenwich Village, another kind of history and a different sort of politics were being made. This was a political history that had nothing to do with states or governments or armies–and had everything to do with art. And this is the story that Sally Banes tells, a year in the life of American culture, a year that would change American life and culture forever. It was in 1963, as Banes’s book shows us, that the Sixties really began.

Banes draws a vibrant portrait of the artists and performers who gave the 1963 Village its exhilarating force, the avant-garde whose interweaving of public and private life, work and play, art and ordinary experience, began a wholesale reworking of the social and cultural fabric of America. Among these young artists were many who went on to become acknowledged masters in their fields, including Andy Warhol, John Cage, Yoko Ono, Yvonne Rainer, Lanford Wilson, Sam Shepard, Brian de Palma, Harvey Keitel, Kate Millet, and Claes Oldenburg. In live performance–Off-Off Broadway theater, Happenings, Fluxus, and dance–as well as in Pop Art and underground film, we see this generation of artists laying the groundwork for the explosion of the counterculture in the late 1960s and the emergence of postmodernism in the 1970s. Exploring themes of community, freedom, equality, the body, and the absolute, Banes shows us how the Sixties artists, though shaped by a culture of hope and optimism, helped to galvanize a culture of criticism and change. As 1963 came to define the Sixties, so this vivid account of the year will redefine a crucial generation in recent American history.”

Publisher Duke University Press, 1993
ISBN 082231357X, 9780822313571
ix+308 pages

Reviews: Serge Guilbaut (Am Hist Rev, 1995), Marla Carlson (Theatre J, 1996), PublishersWeekly (n.d.).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (100 MB, no OCR)