Tom Marioni: Beer, Art and Philosophy (The Exhibition), 1968-2006 (2006)

12 October 2018, dusan

Tom Marioni: Beer, Art, and Philosophy (The Exhibition), 1968–2006 surveys nearly forty years of the artist’s engagement with experience as art. Born in Cincinnati in 1937, Marioni studied drawing, sculpture, and printmaking at the Cincinnati Art Academy, and in 1959 moved to San Francisco where he began to experiment with performance, sound, the sense of taste, and other non-traditional media.

A pioneer of the West Coast Conceptual Art movement, Marioni drew inspiration from artists such as Marcel Duchamp (1887–1968), John Cage (1912–1992), and Joseph Beuys (1921–1986), all of whom challenged the conventions of art. Emphasizing ideas as material for art, these artists exercised a profound influence on Marioni and other conceptual artists of the 1960’s. In 1968, Marioni became a curator at the Bay Area’s Richmond Art Center, where he mounted a series of ambitious Conceptual Art shows. In 1970, he founded the Museum of Conceptual Art in San Francisco, where he continued to experiment, viewing the concept of the museum as an extension of his work, until he closed it in 1984.

Following in the tradition of the “readymade”—Duchamp’s name for common or found objects, which he recontextualized as art—Marioni employed mundane substances such as beer, elevating its significance from a common means of socialization to a catalyst for creative expression and social interaction. This meant that drinking beer with friends could be as profound an experience as gazing at the Mona Lisa. Thus, in Marioni’s view, the act of communication itself takes on aesthetic significance. Like Cage, whose work highlighted chance and ordinary sounds as music, Marioni attempts to make art that is as close to everyday life as possible without becoming life itself. Similar to Beuys, who privileged creative action over the precious and static art object, Marioni’s conversations and gatherings expand the conventions of painting and sculpture.”

Foreword by Linda Shearer
Publisher Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, 2006
ISBN 9780917562778, 0917562771
68 pages

Exhibition
WorldCat

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Stevphen Shukaitis: The Composition of Movements to Come: Aesthetics and Cultural Labor after the Avant-Garde (2016)

14 July 2018, dusan

“How does the avant-garde create spaces in everyday life that subvert regimes of economic and political control? How do art, aesthetics and activism inform one another? And how do strategic spaces of creativity become the basis for new forms of production and governance?

The Composition of Movements to Come reconsiders the history and the practices of the avant-garde, from the Situationists to the Art Strike, revolutionary Constructivism to Laibach and Neue Slowenische Kunst, through an autonomist Marxist framework. Moving the framework beyond an overly narrow class analysis, the book explores broader questions of the changing nature of cultural labor and forms of resistance around this labor. It examines a doubly articulated process of refusal: the refusal of separating art from daily life and the re-fusing of these antagonistic energies by capitalist production and governance. This relationship opens up a new terrain for strategic thought in relation to everyday politics, where the history of the avant-garde is no longer separated from broader questions of political economy or movement, but becomes a point around which to reorient these considerations.”

Publisher Rowman & Littlefield, London & New York, 2016
New Politics of Autonomy series
ISBN 9781783481736, 1783481730
xx+176 pages

Reviews: Gregory Sholette (Critical Inquiry, 2015), Marc James Léger (Afterimage, 2016), Martin Parker (Culture Machine, 2017).

Publisher
WorldCat

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Beneath the Paving Stones: Situationists and the Beach, May 1968 (2001)

7 August 2016, dusan

“This anthology comprises 3 pamphlets—The Poverty of Student Life; Totality for Kids; and The Decline and Fall of the Spectacular Commodity Economy plus eyewitness accounts of the Paris May ’68 events. Much of the Situationist creed was produced in pamphlet form and these three were crucial in creating the Situationist legend. They provide both an introduction to the ideas of the Situs and a provocatively seductive invitation to a life of freedom & revolt which prefigues many of the themes of today’s mass protestors. Illustrated throughout with photos of the May ’68 events and the graffiti that played such a famous role. The 7″ x 7″ size replicates size of the Parisian cobblestones used by the protestors.”

Collected by Dark Star
Publisher AK Press, Edinburgh and San Francisco / Dark Star, 2001
ISBN 1902593383, 9781902593388
120 pages

Review: Charlie Bertsch (Bad Subjects 2001).

WorldCat

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