Women Artists: The Linda Nochlin Reader (2015)

30 October 2017, dusan

“Linda Nochlin (1931-2017) was one of the most accessible, provocative, and innovative art historians of our time. In 1971 she published her essay “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?”—a dramatic feminist call-to-arms that called traditional art historical practices into question and led to a major revision of the discipline.

Women Artists brings together twenty-nine essential essays from throughout Nochlin’s career, making this the definitive anthology of her writing about women in art. Included are her major thematic texts “Women Artists After the French Revolution” and “Starting from Scratch: The Beginnings of Feminist Art History,” as well as the landmark essay and its rejoinder “‘Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?’ Thirty Years After.” These appear alongside monographic entries focusing on a selection of major women artists including Mary Cassatt, Louise Bourgeois, Cecily Brown, Kiki Smith, Miwa Yanagi, and Sophie Calle.

Women Artists also presents two new essays written specifically for this book and an interview with Nochlin investigating the position of women artists today.”

Edited by Maura Reilly
Publisher Thames & Hudson, London and New York, 2015
ISBN 9780500239292, 0500239290
472 pages

Reviews: Chris Kraus (NY Times, 2015), Publishers Weekly (2015).

Publisher
WorldCat

HTML

Tarsila do Amaral (2009) [EN, ES]

15 December 2016, dusan

“Tarsila do Amaral (1886-1973) is one of the major figures of the Latin American vanguard and the symbol of Brazilian Modernism. Exotic, sophisticated and cosmopolitan, she spent two intensive periods in Paris, where she completed what she called the ‘military service’ of Cubism and fed on European avant-garde currents, like a civilized anthropophagite. Upon returning to her country, the digestion of that banquet and her rediscovery of the colors and shapes of her childhood spent in the Brazilian interior would, around 1920, give rise to the most dazzling epoch of her painting.

This catalogue approaches the artist from the remote past of her country, supplemented by the works and writings of her contemporaries as well as essays by experts on her painting.”

Publisher Fundación Juan March, Madrid, and Editorial de Arte y Ciencia, Madrid, 2009
ISBN 9788470755613 (EN)
295 pages

Exhibition
Publisher
WorldCat

English: PDF, PDF (14 MB), View online
Spanish: PDF, PDF (24 MB), View online

Alfred H. Barr, Jr.: Cubism and Abstract Art: Painting, Sculpture, Constructions, Photography, Architecture, Industrial Art, Theatre, Films, Posters, Typography (1936)

16 September 2016, dusan

The catalogue of the first MoMA’s retrospective of modernism, held 2 March-19 April 1936, laid the theoretical foundation of the museum. Its jacket contains a notorious chart of modernist art history, the Diagram of Stylistic Evolution from 1890 until 1935.

“The catalogue remains an important historical document (as does that for Fantastic Art, Dada, Surrealism). It set abstraction within a formalist framework that—ignoring the intellectual byways of French symbolism, German idealism, and Russian Marxism of the previous thirty years—was shaped by the scientific climate that had started a century before. … The exhibition together with the widespread dissemination of its influential catalogue, established Cubism as the central issue of early modernism, abstraction as the goal.” (Sybil Gordon Kantor, 2003)

The exhibition later traveled to another 7 cities: San Francisco, Cincinnati, Minneapolis, Cleveland, Baltimore, Providence, and Grand Rapids.

Publisher Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1936
249 pages
via MoMA

Commentary: Meyer Schapiro (Marxist Quarterly, 1937), Susan Noyes Platt (Art Journal, 1988), Astrit Schmidt Burkhardt (Word & Image, 2000).

Publisher (incl. master checklist and press releases)
WorldCat

PDF (47 MB)