Documenta X, the Book: Politics Poetics (1997)

26 October 2019, dusan

“For the first time in the history of documenta, the companion publication attempts to go beyond a survey and interpretation of the exhibited works of art to document and analyze the cultural development of the western world from 1945 to 1997 in a rich selection of paintings, photos, plans, sketches, maps, essays, quotations, discussions, poems, philosophical essays and manifestos. The book unites the diverse forms of expression in an impressive collage. The artists of documenta X are introduced in a number of artist’s inserts. A provocative, enlivening and thoroughly current reader and reference work for anyone interested in the art and culture of our times.

Since 1955, the documenta exhibition in Kassel, Germany, has served as the world’s most important forum for contemporary art. This year’s series of interlocking exhibitions, conferences, performances, lectures, and – notably – publications will be the tenth documenta and the last of this century. Organized by the respected French curator Catherine David, documenta X is conceived as a manifestation culturelle including a program entitled “100 Days – 100 Guests” that will host an exceptional group of international figures. Acknowledging both the significance of its position at the end of the century and the dramatic aesthetic, technological, and political challenges facing culture in the future, Catherine David has carefully structured the programming for documenta X around two themes: first, a critical reflection on the development of culture since 1945, and, second, an interdisciplinary dialogue about the need for new categories of critical and political discourse. The question where culture stands today in the world serves as the focal intersection of these two organizing themes. Each previous documenta has had a profound impact on the art world: documenta X promises to serve as a genuinely international forum for artists, writers, and thinkers from all disciplines.

Conversations with: Benjamin Buchloh, New York; Andreas Branzi, Milan; Etienne Balibar, Paris; Jacques Rancière, Paris; Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, New York Original contributions by: Peter Bürger, Bremen; Daniel Defert, Paris; Fabrizio Gallanti, Genoa; Serge Gruzinski, Paris; David Harvey, Baltimore; Masao Miyoshi, San Diego; Peter Noller and Klaus Ronneburger, Frankfurt; Hans-Joachim Ruckhaeberle, Berlin; Saskia Sassen, New York; Paul Sztulman, Paris, and others.”

Edited by documenta and Museum Fridericianum Veranstaltungs
Idea and conception by Catherine David and Jean-François Chevrier
Publisher Cantz, Ostfildern-Ruit, 1997
ISBN 3893229116, 9783893229116
830 pages
via Arch

Exh. reviews: Monica Amor (Third Text, 1997), Nancy Princenthal (Art/Text, 1997), Masao Miyoshi (New Left Review, 1998), Sabine Fabo (Leonardo, 1998), Kathryn Hixson (New Art Examiner, 1997), more.
Commentary: Universes in Universe (n.d.)

Exhibition website (archived by Vuk Cosic)
Exhibition archive
Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (74 MB)

Post Office Press (ed.): The Poethics of Scholarship (2018)

6 June 2019, dusan

“This pamphlet explores ways in which to engage scholars to further elaborate the poethics of their scholarship. Following Joan Retallack, who has written extensively about the responsibility that comes with formulating and performing a poetics, which she has captured in her concept of poethics (with an added h), this pamphlet examines what connects the ‘doing’ of scholarship with the ethical components of research. Here, in order to remain ethical we are not able to determine in advance what being ethical would look like, yet, at the same time, ethical decisions need to be made and are being made as part of our publishing practices: where we publish and with whom, in an open way or not, in what form and shape and in which formats. Should we then consider the poethics of scholarship as a poetics of/as change, or as Retallack calls it, a poetics of the swerve (clinamen), which continuously unsettles our familiar notions?

This pamphlet considers how, along with discussions about the contents of our scholarship, and about the different methodologies, theories and politics that we use to give meaning and structure to our research, we should have similar deliberations about the way we do research. This involves paying more attention to the crafting of our own aesthetics and poetics as scholars, including a focus on the medial forms, the formats, and the graphic spaces in and through which we communicate and perform scholarship (and the discourses that surround these), as well as the structures and institutions that shape and determine our scholarly practices.”

Contributions by Janneke Adema, Kaja Marczewska, Frances McDonald and Whitney Trettien.

Publisher Post Office Press & Rope Press, Coventry, 2018
Creative Commons BY 4.0 License
34 pages

Publisher
HCommons

PDF, PDF

Alison Knowles: The House of Dust (2016)

29 May 2019, dusan

“Alison Knowles’s The House of Dust is among the earliest computerized poems, consisting of the phrase “a house of” followed by a randomized sequence of 1) a material, 2) a site or situation, a light source, and 3) a category of inhabitants taken from four distinct lists. In 1968, the computer-generated poem was translated into a physical structure when Knowles received a Guggenheim fellowship to build a house in Chelsea, New York. This architecture was later destroyed, restored and moved to Cal Arts Burbank, California, where Knowles was invited to teach in 1970-72. She enjoyed teaching her classes in the House and invited artists to interact with with its open structure by creating new works.

Reactivating the pedagogical model proposed by The House of Dust (and by Fluxus with which Knowles was associated), this project at CUNY’s James Gallery is the outcome of collaboration between artists and scholars in disciplines including art, architecture, poetry, literature, music, computer science, and performance.”

Publisher The James Gallery, The Graduate Center, CUNY, New York
16 & 12 pages
via Art by Translation

Exhibition

PDF (Research Journal)
PDF (Exhibition Journal)