Artificial Intelligence and Life in 2030: One Hundred Year Study on Artificial Intelligence (2016)

22 December 2018, dusan

“The Stanford One Hundred Year Study on Artificial Intelligence, a project that launched in December 2014, is designed to be a century-long periodic assessment of the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and its influences on people, their communities, and society. Colloquially referred to as “AI100″, the project issued its first report in September 2016. A Standing Committee works with the Stanford Faculty Director of AI100 in overseeing the project and designing its activities. A little more than two years after the first report appeared, we reflect on the decisions made in shaping it, the process that produced it, its major conclusions, and reactions subsequent to its release.

The inaugural AI100 report, which is titled “Artificial Intelligence and Life in 2030,” examines eight domains of human activity in which AI technologies are already starting to affect urban life. In scope, it encompasses domains with emerging products enabled by AI methods and ones raising concerns about technological impact generated by potential AI – enabled systems. The Study Panel members who authored the report and the AI100 Standing Committee, which is the body that directs the AI100 project, intend for it to act as a catalyst, spurring conversations on how we as a society might shape and share the potentially powerful technologies that AI could enable. In addition to influencing researchers and guiding decisions in industry and governments, the report aims to provide the general public with a scientifically and technologically accurate portrayal of the current state of AI and its potential. It aspires to replace conceptions rooted in science fiction books and movies with a realistic foundation for these deliberations.”

Publisher Stanford University, September 2016
Creative Commons BY-ND 4.0 International License
52 pages

Commentary: Barbara J. Grosz & Peter Stone (Communications of the ACM, 2018).

Authors

HTML
PDF, PDF

Noortje Marres, Michael Guggenheim, Alex Wilkie (eds.): Inventing the Social (2018)

26 July 2018, dusan

Inventing the Social showcases recent efforts to develop new ways of knowing society that combine social research with creative practice. With contributions from leading figures in sociology, architecture, geography, design, anthropology, and digital media, the book provides practical and conceptual pointers on how to move beyond the customary distinctions between knowledge and art, and on how to connect the doing, researching and making of social life in potentially new ways.

Presenting concrete projects with a creative approach to researching social life as well as reflections on the wider contexts from which these projects emerge, this collection shows how collaboration across social science, digital media and the arts opens up timely alternatives to narrow, instrumentalist proposals that seek to engineer behaviour and to design community from scratch. To invent the social is to recognise that social life is always already creative in itself and to take this as a starting point for developing different ways of combining representation and intervention in social life.”

Publisher Mattering Press, Manchester, 2018
Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0 License
ISBN 099552775X, 9780995527751
334 pages

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF, PDF (24 MB)

The Global Encyclopaedia of Informality, 2 vols. (2018)

8 February 2018, dusan

“Alena Ledeneva invites you on a voyage of discovery to explore society’s open secrets, unwritten rules and know-how practices. Broadly defined as ‘ways of getting things done’, these invisible yet powerful informal practices tend to escape articulation in official discourse. They include emotion-driven exchanges of gifts or favours and tributes for services, interest-driven know-how (from informal welfare to informal employment and entrepreneurship), identity-driven practices of solidarity, and power-driven forms of co-optation and control. The paradox, or not, of the invisibility of these informal practices is their ubiquity. Expertly practised by insiders but often hidden from outsiders, informal practices are, as this book shows, deeply rooted all over the world, yet underestimated in policy. Entries from the five continents presented in this volume are samples of the truly global and ever-growing collection, made possible by a remarkable collaboration of over 200 scholars across disciplines and area studies. By mapping the grey zones, blurred boundaries, types of ambivalence and contexts of complexity, this book creates the first Global Map of Informality. The accompanying database (www.in-formality.com) is searchable by region, keyword or type of practice.”

Edited by Alena Ledeneva, with Anna Bailey, Sheelagh Barron, Costanza Curro, and Elizabeth Teague
Fringe series
Publisher UCL Press, London, 2018
Creative Commons BY 4.0 License
ISBN 9781911307907 & 9781787351899
xxix+434 & xxix+538 pages

Publisher, Vol. 2
OAPEN, Vol. 2
WorldCat, Vol. 2

Volume 1: PDF, PDF (10 MB)
Volume 2: PDF (15 MB)
Online resource (wiki)