Iterations (2020)

7 December 2020, dusan

Iterations was a series of residencies, exhibitions, research meetings and artistic exchanges committed to investigate the future of artistic collaboration in digitally networked contexts. Iterations is now also a publication that creates and inspires new concepts and openings for works yet to be developed.”

“The editors created a set of descriptions of common threads that were called ‘handles’, and invited each contributor to respond to one of them. During the ‘editorial sprint’ to process the material, scores were produced that allowed for a transversal reading of the contributions (see insert booklet). This practice was named ‘x-dexing’.”

With contributions by Kym Ward, Behuki, common ground, Rica Rickson, Collective Conditions, spideralex.

Edited by Jara Rocha and Manetta Berends
Design by Manetta Berends
Publisher Constant, Brussels, May 2020
Free Art License
[172] & [40] pages

Project website
Publisher

PDF, PDF, Git
Insert booklet PDF, PDF

Open Scores: How to Program the Commons (2020)

11 June 2020, dusan

“The exhibition OPEN SCORES brought together a series of practices through which artists articulate their specific forms of digital commons. From online archives, to digital tools/infrastructure and educational formats, the projects envision a (post-)digital culture in which notions of collaboration, free access to knowledge, sustainable use of shared resources and data privacy are central. For the exhibition, each of the projects created a unique score to present their practice.”

Participants: Dušan Barok (monoskop.org), Marcell Mars & Tomislav Medak (memoryoftheworld.org), Sebastian Lütgert & Jan Gerber (0xdb.org), Kenneth Goldsmith (ubu.com), Sean Dockray (AAAAARG), Zeljko Blace (#QUEERingNETWORKing), Ruth Catlow & Marc Garrett (furtherfield.org), Laurence Rassel (erg.be), Marek Tuszynski (Tactical Tech), Michael Murtaugh, Femke Snelting & Peter Westenberg (Constant), Stefanie Wuschitz (Mz* Baltazar’s Lab), Panayotis Antoniadis (nethood.org), Alessandro Ludovico (neural.it), Eva Weinmayr (andpublishing.org), spideralex, Sakrowski (curatingyoutube.net), Creating Commons.

Curated by Creating Commons (Shusha Niederberger, Cornelia Sollfrank, Felix Stalder).

Publisher Creating Commons, Jun 2020
Creative Commons BY-SA 4.0 International License
[40] pages

Project website
Exhibition
Publisher

PDF (40 MB)

See also Aesthetics of the Commons (2021).

Jennifer Iverson: Electronic Inspirations: Technologies of the Cold War Musical Avant-Garde (2018)

29 April 2020, dusan

“Cold War electronic music—made with sine tone and white-noise generators, filters, and magnetic tape—was the driving force behind the evolution of both electronic and acoustic music in the second half of the twentieth century. Electronic music blossomed at the Westdeutscher Rundfunk (WDR [West German Radio]) in Cologne in the 1950s, when technologies were plentiful and the need for cultural healing was great. Building an electronic studio, West Germany confronted the decimation of the “Zero Hour” and began to rebuild its cultural prowess. The studio’s greatest asset was its laboratory culture, where composers worked under a paradigm of invisible collaboration with technicians, scientists, performers, intellectuals, and the machines themselves. Composers and their invisible collaborators repurposed military machinery in studio spaces that were formerly fascist broadcasting propaganda centers. Composers of Cold War electronic music reappropriated information theory and experimental phonetics, creating aesthetic applications from military discourses. In performing such reclamations, electronic music optimistically signaled cultural growth and progress, even as it also sonified technophobic anxieties. Electronic music—a synthesis of technological, scientific, and aesthetic discourses—was the ultimate Cold War innovation, and its impacts reverberate today.”

Publisher Oxford University Press, New York, 2018
The New Cultural History of Music series
ISBN 9780190868192, 0190868198
xi+303 pages

Reviews: Lucie Vágnerová (Integral, 2019), Ted Gordon (Current Musicology, 2019), James Davis (Music & Letters, 2019), Maurice Windleburn (Sound Studies, 2020).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (32 MB)