Elizabeth Losh, Jacqueline Wernimont (eds.): Bodies of Information: Intersectional Feminism and Digital Humanities (2018)

25 July 2019, dusan

“In recent years, the digital humanities has been shaken by important debates about inclusivity and scope—but what change will these conversations ultimately bring about? Can the digital humanities complicate the basic assumptions of tech culture, or will this body of scholarship and practices simply reinforce preexisting biases? Bodies of Information addresses this question by assembling a varied group of voices, showcasing feminist contributions to a panoply of topics, including ubiquitous computing, game studies, new materialisms, and cultural phenomena like hashtag activism, hacktivism, and campaigns against online misogyny.”

Contributors: Babalola Titilola Aiyegbusi, Moya Bailey, Bridget Blodgett, Barbara Bordalejo, Jason Boyd, Christina Boyles, Susan Brown, Lisa Brundage, micha cárdenas, Marcia Chatelain, Danielle Cole, Beth Coleman, T. L. Cowan, Constance Crompton, Amy E. Earhart, Nickoal Eichmann-Kalwara, Julia Flanders, Sandra Gabriele, Brian Getnick, Karen Gregory, Alison Hedley, Kathryn Holland, James Howe, Jeana Jorgensen, Alexandra Juhasz, Dorothy Kim, Kimberly Knight, Lorraine Janzen Kooistra, Sharon M. Leon, Izetta Autumn Mobley, Padmini Ray Murray, Veronica Paredes, Roopika Risam, Bonnie Ruberg, Laila Shereen Sakr, Anastasia Salter, Michelle Schwartz, Emily Sherwood, Deb Verhoeven, Scott B. Weingart.

Publisher University of Minnesota Press, 2018
Debates in the Digital Humanities series, 4
Open Access
ISBN 9781517906108, 1517906105
xxv+491 pages

Editor
Publisher
WorldCat

HTML

Matthew G. Kirschenbaum: Track Changes: A Literary History of Word Processing (2016)

30 July 2018, dusan

“The story of writing in the digital age is every bit as messy as the ink-stained rags that littered the floor of Gutenberg’s print shop or the hot molten lead of the Linotype machine. During the period of the pivotal growth and widespread adoption of word processing as a writing technology, some authors embraced it as a marvel while others decried it as the death of literature. The product of years of archival research and numerous interviews conducted by the author, Track Changes is the first literary history of word processing.

Matthew Kirschenbaum examines how the interests and ideals of creative authorship came to coexist with the computer revolution. Who were the first adopters? What kind of anxieties did they share? Was word processing perceived as just a better typewriter or something more? How did it change our understanding of writing?

Track Changes balances the stories of individual writers with a consideration of how the seemingly ineffable act of writing is always grounded in particular instruments and media, from quills to keyboards. Along the way, we discover the candidates for the first novel written on a word processor, explore the surprisingly varied reasons why writers of both popular and serious literature adopted the technology, trace the spread of new metaphors and ideas from word processing in fiction and poetry, and consider the fate of literary scholarship and memory in an era when the final remnants of authorship may consist of folders on a hard drive or documents in the cloud.”

Publisher Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2016
ISBN 9780674417076, 0674417070
xvi+344+[16] pages
via slowrotation

Reviews: Brian Dillon (The Guardian, 2016), Jessica Pressman (ALH Online Reviews, 2016), Eric Banks (Bookforum, 2016), Dylan Hicks (LA Review of Books, 2016), Kirkus Reviews (2016), Francis Russell (Hong Kong Review of Books, 2016), A. Bowdoin Van Riper (PopMatters, 2016), Leann Davis Alspaugh (Hedgehog Review, 2016), Thomas Padilla (American Archivist, 2017), Lai-Tze Fan (Papers of The Bibliographical Society of Canada, 2017), Seth Erickson (Interactions, 2017), David Walden (TUGboat, 2017), Grant Wythoff (Revista Hispánica Moderna, 2018), Elena Spadini (Umanistica Digitale, 2018).

Online companion
Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (14 MB)
EPUB

Lev Manovich: Instagram and Contemporary Image (2017)

16 October 2017, dusan

“This in-depth study of Instagram combines methods from art history, media studies, and data science, and draws on computational analysis of 16 million Instagram photos shared in 17 global cities since 2012. The data collection and analysis were performed in Manovich’s Cultural Analytics Lab in the Qualcomm Institute (UCSD Division of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology). ”

Self-published September 2017
Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 4.0 International License
148 pages

Author

PDF, PDF (13 MB)