New Formations, 78: Materialities of Text: Between the Codex and the Net (2013)

18 December 2019, dusan

“The cultural authority of the codex form of the book appears to be in a process of displacement ensuing from the rise of on-line digital media. The traditional material structures of the book – its physical forms and its institutional forms of production, circulation, and preservation – are often seen as being subject to dematerialisation; evaporating in the transitory appearances of the digital screen and in the proliferation of new systems of production. However, this issue of New Formations makes the case that the present historical juncture should be understood as a mixed media milieu, in which traditional and digital forms of writing and publishing coalesce and conflict in a complex array of textual materialities.

Such materialities of text are at once sites of political and aesthetic experimentation, and of intense capitalization, intersecting features which are approached in the articles collected here through a broad range of theoretical and empirical themes: diagrammatic writing; the material reading formations of a best-seller novel; grey literature in the institutions of cultural studies; Black Twitter; the politics of Open Access and the artists’ book; digital humanities and its political problematics; the bibliopolitics of the passport; and the political and aesthetic forms of independent publishing.”

Contributions by Richard Burt, Sanjay Sharma, Hanna Kuusela, Johanna Drucker, Ted Striphas and Mark Hayward, Sas Mays, Janneke Adema and Gary Hall, Jodi Dean, Sean Dockray, Alessandro Ludovico, Pauline van Mourik, Broekman, Nicholas Thoburn and Dmitry Vilensky.

Edited and with an Introduction by Sas Mays and Nicholas Thoburn
Publisher Lawrence & Wishart, Summer 2013
ISSN 0950-2378
207 pages

Review: Janneke Adema (2013).

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Elizabeth Losh, Jacqueline Wernimont (eds.): Bodies of Information: Intersectional Feminism and Digital Humanities (2018)

25 July 2019, dusan

“In recent years, the digital humanities has been shaken by important debates about inclusivity and scope—but what change will these conversations ultimately bring about? Can the digital humanities complicate the basic assumptions of tech culture, or will this body of scholarship and practices simply reinforce preexisting biases? Bodies of Information addresses this question by assembling a varied group of voices, showcasing feminist contributions to a panoply of topics, including ubiquitous computing, game studies, new materialisms, and cultural phenomena like hashtag activism, hacktivism, and campaigns against online misogyny.”

Contributors: Babalola Titilola Aiyegbusi, Moya Bailey, Bridget Blodgett, Barbara Bordalejo, Jason Boyd, Christina Boyles, Susan Brown, Lisa Brundage, micha cárdenas, Marcia Chatelain, Danielle Cole, Beth Coleman, T. L. Cowan, Constance Crompton, Amy E. Earhart, Nickoal Eichmann-Kalwara, Julia Flanders, Sandra Gabriele, Brian Getnick, Karen Gregory, Alison Hedley, Kathryn Holland, James Howe, Jeana Jorgensen, Alexandra Juhasz, Dorothy Kim, Kimberly Knight, Lorraine Janzen Kooistra, Sharon M. Leon, Izetta Autumn Mobley, Padmini Ray Murray, Veronica Paredes, Roopika Risam, Bonnie Ruberg, Laila Shereen Sakr, Anastasia Salter, Michelle Schwartz, Emily Sherwood, Deb Verhoeven, Scott B. Weingart.

Publisher University of Minnesota Press, 2018
Debates in the Digital Humanities series, 4
Open Access
ISBN 9781517906108, 1517906105
xxv+491 pages

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Culture Machine, 17: Thermal Objects (2019)

8 May 2019, dusan

“This special issue of Culture Machine addresses thermal processes, bodies and media. When heat and cold appear in the humanities and social sciences, they are often treated exclusively as metaphors—think of Ferdinand Tönnies’s description of the modern, urbanized society as a cooling process that freezes the warm, authentic community; or Marshall McLuhan’s distinction between hot and cold media. While thermal metaphors turn out to be useful—perhaps even constitutive—tools that make abstract notions imaginable and tangible, recent discussions on the materiality of the social offer a productive background for new theorizations of temperatures that exceed their metaphorical valences.

This special issue aims to rethink the relation of metaphor and materiality: How can we theoretically account for thermal mechanisms as balance, transfer or collapse? What does it mean to perform hot or cool critical theoretical interventions? These and other questions will be investigated across three temperature-related dimensions: the senses, thermic media and thermopolitics.” (from CfP)

With contributions by Elena Beregow, Wolfgang Ernst, Erhard Schüttpelz, Samir Bhowmik, Paula Schönach, Nigel Clark, Nicole Starosielski, Niall Martin, John Hockey and Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson, Hilary Bergen, Gunnar Schmidt, and Agustina Andreoletti.

Edited by Elena Beregow
Publisher Open Humanities Press, April 2019
Open Access
ISSN 1465-4121

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