Matthew Fuller, Andrew Goffey: Evil Media (2012)

30 November 2013, dusan

Evil Media develops a philosophy of media power that extends the concept of media beyond its tried and trusted use in the games of meaning, symbolism, and truth. It addresses the gray zones in which media exist as corporate work systems, algorithms and data structures, twenty-first century self-improvement manuals, and pharmaceutical techniques. Evil Media invites the reader to explore and understand the abstract infrastructure of the present day. From search engines to flirting strategies, from the value of institutional stupidity to the malicious minutiae of databases, this book shows how the devil is in the details.

The title takes the imperative “Don’t be evil” and asks, what would be done any differently in contemporary computational and networked media were that maxim reversed.

Media here are about much more and much less than symbols, stories, information, or communication: media do things. They incite and provoke, twist and bend, leak and manage. In a series of provocative stratagems designed to be used, Evil Media sets its reader an ethical challenge: either remain a transparent intermediary in the networks and chains of communicative power or become oneself an active, transformative medium.”

Publisher MIT Press, 2012
ISBN 0262304406, 9780262304405
235 pages

Review: Nicholas Holm (Media Int’l AU, 2013).
Evil media on Monoskop wiki

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PDF (updated on 2016-10-13)
HTML (added on 2015-8-28)

See also YoHa, et al., Evil Media Distribution Centre, 2013.

Department of Eagles (eds.): Pedagogies of Disaster (2013) [English/Albanian]

21 October 2013, dusan

We live in an era where the university system is undergoing great changes owing to developments in financing policies and research priorities, as well as changes in the society in which this system is embedded. This change toward a more market-oriented university, which also has immediate effects in academic peripheries such as the Balkans, the Middle East, or South-East Asia, is of great influence for the pedagogical practice of “less profitable” academic areas such as the Humanities: philosophy, languages, sociology, anthropology, history.

Because of the absence of a historically grounded establishment of the Humanities, academic peripheries, usually accompanied by a weak civil society infrastructure, seem to offer the most fertile ground for rethinking the Humanities, their pedagogical practice, and their politics, as well as the greatest threats, such as the ongoing capitalization of research, and profitability as the norm of educational achievement. The sprawling presence of for-profit universities and in academic peripheries such as Albania and Kosovo is indicative of this problematic, as are consistent underfunding of universities and the relentless budget cuts in American and English, and to a lesser extent European, universities. Motivations for this ongoing attack on the university are often driven by a political system or a politics with an aggressive stance to critical thought.

At the same time, such an absence of historical grounding may inspire a rejuvenation and reinvigoration of research in the Humanities, such as may be seen in academic centers around Asia, as many young scholars are attracted to an educational environment which is not yet completely petrified in bureaucratic procedures. In this case, a different set of questions appear concerning the place of the scholar in societies with semi-democratic or even authoritarian rule. For civil society to flourish, an educational system that reflects and interrogates the values and concepts that underlie a healthy social fabric are of crucial importance.

This volume comprises papers culled from continent. journal’s Pedagogies of Disaster conference held in Tirana, Albania, hosted by The Department of Eagles (Departamenti i Shqiponjave) in June 2013, and organized to address the fate of relation and the future of pedagogical practice in the University, and especially as it concerns the humanities. The papers gathered here seek to address the infrastructural or interpersonal changes in the modes of production as it relates to current academia, examining the elements and spaces of the rifts opening up in the polis of the University—its students, professors and administrators. The volume further addresses the pedagogical horizon at a critical limit, asking: for whom or for what are we teaching and from whom or from what are we learning?

Edited by Vincent W.J. van Gerven Oei, Adam Staley Groves, and Nico Jenkins (for The Department of Eagles, Tirana, Albania)
Translations by Jonida Gashi
Publisher Punctum Books, New York, October 2013
Brooklyn, NY: punctum books, 2013.
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License
552 pages
ISBN 0615898718, 9780615898711

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Olga Goriunova (ed.): Readme 100: Temporary Software Art Factory (2006)

1 June 2013, dusan

“This book discusses projects and research completed in the framework of the Readme 100 Temporary Software Art Factory, which took place in Dortmund in November 2005 and was co-organized by Hartware MedienKunstVerein.

It deals with the topic of production as it relates to software, software art and software cultures. Thus, it focuses not only on software as a product itself, but also on the experiment of its production through methods including outsourcing, use of open source solutions and self-production. Topics addressed include economies of arts, desire and openness, harmony of markets, the unmarketable, reverse outsourcing, resistant mapping and others.

The result is a multi-faceted collection of project descriptions, illustrations, research texts and features relating to the theme of software art production.”

Authors include: Amy Alexander, Inke Arns, Christophe Bruno, Javier Candeira, Yves Degoyon, Elpueblodechina, Olga Goriunova, Francis Hunger, Sven Konig, Eric Londaits, Alessandro Ludovico, Ilia Malinovsky, Alex McLean, Special guest, Julian Rohrhuber, Alexei Shulgin, Leonardo Solaas, Mitchell Whitelaw, Renate Wieser.

Publisher Hartware MedienKunstVerein, Dortmund, 2006
ISBN 3833443693
168 pages

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