Roman Rosdolsky: The Making of Marx’s Capital (1968–) [IT, SR-CR, EN, ES, PT-BR]

15 May 2014, dusan

Rosdolsky’s Making of Marx’s ‘Capital’ is a major work of interpretation and criticism, written over fifteen years by one of the foremost representatives of the European marxist tradition. Rosdolsky investigates the relationship between various versions of Capital and explains the reasons for Marx’s sucessive reworkings; he provides a textual exegesis of Marx’s Grundrisse, now widely available, and reveals its methodological riches. He presents a critique of later work in the marxist tradition on the basis of Marx’s fundamental distinction between ‘capital in general’ and ‘capital in conrete reality.’

First published in German as Entstehungsgeschichte des Marxschen ‘Kapital’, Europäische Verlagsanstalt, Frankfut am Main, 1968

English edition
Translated by Pete Burgess
Publisher Pluto Press, London, 1977
581 pages

Review (Makoto Itoh, Science & Society, 1979)
Wikipedia (DE)

Genesi e struttura del “Capitale” di Marx (Italian, trans. Bruno Maffi, 1971, no OCR, 21 MB, via)
Prilog povijesti nastajanja Marxova “Kapitala”, sv. 1, sv. 2 (Serbo-Croatian, trans. Ivan Prpić [1] and Hotimir Burger [2], 1975)
The Making of Marx’s Capital (English, trans. Pete Burgess, 1977, 10 MB)
Génesis y estructura de El Capital de Marx (Spanish, trans. Léon Mames, 2nd ed., 1978/2004, no OCR, 11 MB)
Genese e estrutura de O capital de Karl Marx (Brazilian Portuguese, trans. César Benjamin, 2001, no OCR, 20 MB)

Barbara Cassin (ed.): Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon (2004–) [FR, EN]

9 April 2014, dusan

“This is an encyclopedic dictionary of close to 400 important philosophical, literary, and political terms and concepts that defy easy–or any–translation from one language and culture to another. Drawn from more than a dozen languages, terms such as Dasein (German), pravda (Russian), saudade (Portuguese), and stato (Italian) are thoroughly examined in all their cross-linguistic and cross-cultural complexities. Spanning the classical, medieval, early modern, modern, and contemporary periods, these are terms that influence thinking across the humanities. The entries, written by more than 150 distinguished scholars, describe the origins and meanings of each term, the history and context of its usage, its translations into other languages, and its use in notable texts. The dictionary also includes essays on the special characteristics of particular languages–English, French, German, Greek, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish.

Originally published in French, this one-of-a-kind reference work is now available in English for the first time, with new contributions from Judith Butler, Daniel Heller-Roazen, Ben Kafka, Kevin McLaughlin, Kenneth Reinhard, Stella Sandford, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Jane Tylus, Anthony Vidler, Susan Wolfson, Robert J. C. Young, and many more.The result is an invaluable reference for students, scholars, and general readers interested in the multilingual lives of some of our most influential words and ideas.”

The book has been or is in the process of being translated into Arabic, Chinese, Farsi, Portuguese (5 Vols, scheduled 2009-11), Romanian (scheduled 2013), Russian, Spanish, and Ukrainian (3 Vols, 2009-13, (2), (3)).

First published in French as Vocabulaire européen des philosophies: Dictionnaire des intraduisibles, Seuil/Le Robert, Paris, 2004.

English edition
Translated by Steven Rendall, Christian Hubert, Jeffrey Mehlman, Nathanael Stein, and Michael Syrotinski
Translation edited by Emily Apter, Jacques Lezra and Michael Wood
Publisher Princeton University Press, 2014
Translation/Transnation series
ISBN 0691138702, 9780691138701
1344 pages

Untranslatables and their Translations (Barbara Cassin, Transeuropéennes, 2009, in French, English, Arabic and Turkish)
Commentary (Jacques Lezra, video, 12 min, 2014, in English)
Wikipedia (FR)

Project website (at Internet Archive)
Publisher (FR)
Publisher (EN)

Vocabulaire européen des philosophies – Échantillon IMAGE (French, HTML version of 30 entries related to the notion of image)
Dictionary of Untranslatables (EPUB, (2); PDF)

Ariel Dorfman, Armand Mattelart: How to Read Donald Duck: Imperialist Ideology in the Disney Comic (1972–) [ES, EN, PT, TR]

11 March 2014, dusan

How to Read Donald Duck is a Marxist political analysis by Ariel Dorfman and Armand Mattelart on what they perceive is cultural imperialism in popular entertainment, published in Chile in 1972. Written in the form of essay (or, in the authors’ words, a “decolonization manual”), the book is an analysis of mass literature, specifically the Disney comics published for the Latin American market. It is one of the first social studies of entertainment and the leisure industry from a political-ideological angle, and the book deals extensively with the political role of children’s literature. (from Wikipedia)

First published by Ediciones Universitarias de Valparaíso, Chile, 1972

First published in English in 1975
Translated and with an Introduction by David Kunzle
With Appendix by John Shelton Lawrence
Publisher International General, New York, 1991 (Fourth printing)
ISBN 0884770370
119 pages
via Quaxo Coricopat

An interview with Mattelart in which he shortly discusses the book (2008, in English)
2012 project for appropriation of the book (includes its online edition)

Para leer al Pato Donald. Comunicación de masa y colonialismo (Spanish, 18th ed., 1972/1979)
How to Read Donald Duck: Imperialist Ideology in the Disney Comic (English, trans. David Kunzle, 1975/1991, 10 MB, updated 2015-5-10)
Para ler o Pato Donald: comunicação de massa e colonialismo (Portuguese, trans. Álvaro de Moya, 2nd ed., 1976/1980)
Emperyalist Kültür Sanayii ve Walt Disney: Vakvak Amca Nasıl Okunmalı? (Turkish, trans. Atilla Aksoy, 1977)