Ravi Sundaram: Pirate Modernity: Delhi’s Media Urbanism (2009)

25 September 2019, dusan

“Using Delhi’s contemporary history as a site for reflection, Pirate Modernity moves from a detailed discussion of the technocratic design of the city by US planners in the 1950s, to the massive expansions after 1977, culminating in the urban crisis of the 1990s.

As a practice, pirate modernity is an illicit form of urban globalization. Poorer urban populations increasingly inhabit non-legal spheres: unauthorized neighborhoods, squatter camps and bypass legal technological infrastructures (media, electricity). This pirate culture produces a significant enabling resource for subaltern populations unable to enter the legal city. Equally, this is an unstable world, bringing subaltern populations into the harsh glare of permanent technological visibility, and attacks by urban elites, courts and visceral media industries. The book examines contemporary Delhi from some of these sites: the unmaking of the citys modernist planning design, new technological urban networks that bypass states and corporations, and the tragic experience of the road accident terrifyingly enhanced by technological culture. Pirate Modernity moves between past and present, along with debates in Asia, Africa and Latin America on urbanism, media culture, and everyday life.
 
This pioneering book suggests cities have to be revisited afresh after proliferating media culture. Pirate Modernity boldly draws from urban and cultural theory to open a new agenda for a world after media urbanism.”

Publisher Routledge, Oxford & New York, 2009
Asia’s Transformations series
ISBN 9780415409667, 0415409667
xix+224 pages
HT Geraldine

Reviews: Diya Mehra (SAMAJ, 2011), Fei An Tjan (Masters of Media, 2010).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (10 MB)

Walter D. Mignolo, Catherine E. Walsh: On Decoloniality: Concepts, Analytics, Praxis (2018)

20 June 2018, dusan

“In On Decoloniality Walter D. Mignolo and Catherine E. Walsh explore the hidden forces of the colonial matrix of power, its origination, transformation, and current presence, while asking the crucial questions of decoloniality’s how, what, why, with whom, and what for. Interweaving theory-praxis with local histories and perspectives of struggle, they illustrate the conceptual and analytic dynamism of decolonial ways of living and thinking, as well as the creative force of resistance and re-existence. This book speaks to the urgency of these times, encourages delinkings from the colonial matrix of power and its ‘universals’ of Western modernity and global capitalism, and engages with arguments and struggles for dignity and life against death, destruction, and civilizational despair.”

Publisher Duke University Press, Durham, 2018
ISBN 9780822370949, 0822370948
xiii+291 pages

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (3 MB)

Anselm Franke, Hyunjin Kim (eds.): 2 or 3 Tigers (2017)

11 June 2017, dusan

This publication “presents a range of mostly newly written texts in relation to the exhibition 2 or 3 Tigers. Departing from the symbolic uses and iconographies of tigers in modernity, several articles discuss particular artworks in and beyond the exhibition while others delve more deeply into historiographies of colonialism and modernization processes. Texts by artists, art historians, and writers of other disciplines outline subterranean histories in the shadow of geopolitical divides, militarization, the mobilization of tradition, and changing conceptions of media, and provide a critical analysis of political and cultural contexts where the actual presence and the mythology of tigers are historically entangled.”

Essays by Kevin Chua, Anselm Franke, Masato Fukushima, Ho Tzu Nyen, James T. Hong, Yuk Hui, Hyunjin Kim, Yongwoo Lee, Park Chan-kyong, and Filipa Ramos.

Publisher Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin, 2017
Open access

Exhibition

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