Donna J. Haraway: Staying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene (2016)

29 December 2016, dusan

“In the midst of spiraling ecological devastation, multispecies feminist theorist Donna J. Haraway offers provocative new ways to reconfigure our relations to the earth and all its inhabitants. She eschews referring to our current epoch as the Anthropocene, preferring to conceptualize it as what she calls the Chthulucene, as it more aptly and fully describes our epoch as one in which the human and nonhuman are inextricably linked in tentacular practices. The Chthulucene, Haraway explains, requires sym-poiesis, or making-with, rather than auto-poiesis, or self-making. Learning to stay with the trouble of living and dying together on a damaged earth will prove more conducive to the kind of thinking that would provide the means to building more livable futures. Theoretically and methodologically driven by the signifier SF—string figures, science fact, science fiction, speculative feminism, speculative fabulation, so far—Staying with the Trouble further cements Haraway’s reputation as one of the most daring and original thinkers of our time.”

Publisher Duke University Press, 2016
Experimental Futures series
ISBN 9780822373780, 0822373785
xv+296 pages

Talk (video, 25 min, 2014)

Reviews: Archie Davies (Antipode, 2016), Matt Thompson (Savage Minds, 2016), Danya Glabau (J Cultural Economy, 2017).

Publisher
WorldCat

HTML (removed on 2017-5-17 upon request from publisher)

William R. Catton, Jr.: Overshoot: The Ecological Basis of Revolutionary Change (1980)

13 October 2016, dusan

This famous book outlines William R. Catton’s realization of “the urgent need for everyone, including sociologists, to recognize that our lifestyles, mores, institutions, patterns of interaction, values, and expectations are shaped by a cultural heritage that was formed in a time when carrying capacity exceeded the human load. A cultural heritage can outlast the conditions that produced it. That carrying capacity surplus is gone now, eroded both by population increase and immense techno-logical enlargement of per capita resource appetites and environmental impacts. Human life is now being lived in an era of deepening carrying capacity deficit. All of the familiar aspects of human societal life are under compelling pressure to change in this new era when the load increasingly exceeds the carrying capacities of many local regions—and of a finite planet. Social disorganization, friction, demoralization, and conflict will escalate.” (Catton, 2008)

Publisher University of Illinois Press, 1980
ISBN 0252009886
xvii+298 pages

Publisher
Wikipedia
WorldCat

PDF (16 MB, glossary missing)