Judy Wajcman: TechnoFeminism (2004–) [EN, ES]

25 April 2018, dusan

“This timely and engaging book argues that technoscientific advances are radically transforming the woman-machine relationship. However, it is feminist politics rather than the technologies themselves that make the difference. TechnoFeminism fuses the visionary insights of cyberfeminism with a materialist analysis of the sexual politics of technology.”

Publisher Polity Press, 2004
ISBN 9780745630441, 0745630448
viii+148 pages

Reviews: Martha McCaughey (American Journal of Sociology, 2006), Rosalind Gill (Science as Culture, 2005), Sarah M. Brown (NWSA Journal, 2007), Eva Patricia Gil (UOC Papers, 2007, Spanish), Isabel Clúa (n.d., Spanish).

Wikipedia (EN)
Publisher (EN)
WorldCat (EN)

TechnoFeminism (English, 30 MB)
El tecnofeminismo (Spanish, trans. Magalí Martínez Solimán, 2006, via)

See also Wajcman’s Feminism Confronts Technology, 1991.

McKenzie Wark: Molecular Red: Theory for the Anthropocene (2015)

14 May 2016, dusan

“In Molecular Red, McKenzie Wark creates philosophical tools for the Anthropocene, our new planetary epoch, in which human and natural forces are so entwined that the future of one determines that of the other.

Wark explores the implications of Anthropocene through the story of two empires, the Soviet and then the American. The fall of the former prefigures that of the latter. From the ruins of these mighty histories, Wark salvages ideas to help us picture what kind of worlds collective labor might yet build. From the Russian revolution, Wark unearths the work of Alexander Bogdanov—Lenin’s rival—as well as the great Proletkult writer and engineer Andrey Platonov.

The Soviet experiment emerges from the past as an allegory for the new organizational challenges of our time. From deep within the Californian military-entertainment complex, Wark retrieves Donna Haraway‘s cyborg critique and science fiction writer Kim Stanley Robinson’s Martian utopia as powerful resources for rethinking and remaking the world that climate change has wrought. Molecular Red proposes an alternative realism, where hope is found in what remains and endures.”

Publisher Verso, London and New York, March 2015
ISBN 1781688273, 9781781688274
xxiv+280 pages

Reviews: Slavoj Žižek (Verso 2015, Wark’s response), John Beck (Radical Philosophy 2015), Mark Rappolt (ArtReview 2015), Maria Chehonadskih (Mute 2015, Wark’s response), Two Grenadiers (2015), Pieter Vermeulen & Tom Chadwick (nY 2016), Jim Harper (LSE Review of Books 2016).
Commentary: Joe Guinan (Renewal 2015), Jernej Kaluža (Radio Student 2019, SL).

Video lecture (Concordia U, Apr 2015)
Publisher
WorldCat

HTML

See also Molecular Red Reader compiled by Wark (PDF).

Catalyst: Feminism, Theory, Technoscience 1(1): Inaugural Issue (2015)

15 October 2015, dusan

Catalyst is an online, juried journal that expands the feminist and critical intellectual legacies of science and technology studies into theory-intensive research, critique, and practice. It supports intersectional and transnational scholarship and seeks to foster accessibility and experimentation in scholarly form. The inaugural issue demonstrates the scope of Catalyst‘s intellectual and political vision.”

With contributions by Lindsey Andrews, Neda Atanasoski, Kalindi Vora, Jih-Fei Cheng, Anne Pollock, Elizabeth A. Wilson, Jackie Orr, Joanna Zylinska, S. Lochlann Jain, Jackie Stacey, Lilly Irani, Monika Sengul-Jones, Jenny Reardon, Jacob Metcalf, Martha Kenney, Karen Barad, Daphna Joel, Anelis Kaiser, Sarah S. Richardson, Stacey A. Ritz, Deboleena Roy, Banu Subramaniam, a.o.

Publisher University of California, San Diego, September 2015
Open access
ISSN 2380-3312

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