Matthew Fuller, Olga Goriunova: Bleak Joys: Aesthetics of Ecology and Impossibility (2019)

21 April 2020, dusan

Bleak Joys develops an understanding of complex entities and processes—from plant roots to forests to ecological damage and its calculation—as aesthetic. It is also a book about “bad” things, such as anguish and devastation, which relate to the ecological and technical but are also constitutive of politics, the ethical, and the formation of subjects.

Avidly interdisciplinary, Bleak Joys draws on scientific work in plant sciences, computing, and cybernetics, as well as mathematics, literature, and art in ways that are not merely illustrative of but foundational to our understanding of ecological aesthetics and the condition in which the posthumanities are being forged. It places the sensory world of plants next to the generalized and nonlinear infrastructure of irresolvability—the economics of indifference up against the question of how to make a home on Planet Earth in a condition of damaged ecologies. Crosscutting chapters on devastation, anguish, irresolvability, luck, plant, and home create a vivid and multifaceted approach that is as remarkable for its humor as for its scholarly complexity.

Engaging with Deleuze, Guattari, and Bakhtin, among others, Bleak Joys captures the modes of crises that constitute our present ecological and political condition, and reckons with the means by which they are not simply aesthetically known but aesthetically manifest.”

Publisher University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis, 2019
Posthumanities series, 53
ISBN 9781517905521, 1517905524
xxviii+192 pages

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (6 MB)

Donna Haraway Reads The National Geographic on Primates (1987)

8 December 2017, dusan

“How does the ‘cultured’ gorilla, i.e. Koko, come to represent universal man? Author and cultural critic Donna Haraway untangles the web of meanings, tracing what gets to count as nature, for whom and when, and how much it costs to produce nature at a particular moment in history for a particular group of people. A feminist journey through the anthropological junglescape.”

Originally broadcasted on Paper Tiger Television in 1987.

The video was posted on the website of Paper Tiger TV in May 2017 under Creative Commons BY-NC-ND License.

MP4 (357 MB)

Anselm Franke, Hyunjin Kim (eds.): 2 or 3 Tigers (2017)

11 June 2017, dusan

This publication “presents a range of mostly newly written texts in relation to the exhibition 2 or 3 Tigers. Departing from the symbolic uses and iconographies of tigers in modernity, several articles discuss particular artworks in and beyond the exhibition while others delve more deeply into historiographies of colonialism and modernization processes. Texts by artists, art historians, and writers of other disciplines outline subterranean histories in the shadow of geopolitical divides, militarization, the mobilization of tradition, and changing conceptions of media, and provide a critical analysis of political and cultural contexts where the actual presence and the mythology of tigers are historically entangled.”

Essays by Kevin Chua, Anselm Franke, Masato Fukushima, Ho Tzu Nyen, James T. Hong, Yuk Hui, Hyunjin Kim, Yongwoo Lee, Park Chan-kyong, and Filipa Ramos.

Publisher Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin, 2017
Open access

Exhibition

HTML, PDFs