Jennifer Gabrys: Program Earth: Environmental Sensing Technology and the Making of a Computational Planet (2016)

28 July 2017, dusan

“Sensors are everywhere. Small, flexible, economical, and computationally powerful, they operate ubiquitously in environments. They compile massive amounts of data, including information about air, water, and climate. Never before has such a volume of environmental data been so broadly collected or so widely available.

Grappling with the consequences of wiring our world, Program Earth examines how sensor technologies are programming our environments. As Jennifer Gabrys points out, sensors do not merely record information about an environment. Rather, they generate new environments and environmental relations. At the same time, they give a voice to the entities they monitor: to animals, plants, people, and inanimate objects. This book looks at the ways in which sensors converge with environments to map ecological processes, to track the migration of animals, to check pollutants, to facilitate citizen participation, and to program infrastructure. Through discussing particular instances where sensors are deployed for environmental study and citizen engagement across three areas of environmental sensing, from wild sensing to pollution sensing and urban sensing, Program Earth asks how sensor technologies specifically contribute to new environmental conditions. What are the implications for wiring up environments? How do sensor applications not only program environments, but also program the sorts of citizens and collectives we might become?

Program Earth suggests that the sensor-based monitoring of Earth offers the prospect of making new environments not simply as an extension of the human but rather as new “technogeographies” that connect technology, nature, and people.”

Publisher University of Minnesota Press, 2016
Electronic Mediations series, 49
ISBN 9780816693122, 0816693129
x+357 pages
via publisher

Reviews: Etienne S. Benson (Am J Sociology, 2017), Matthew W. Wilson (Cultural Geographies, 2017).
Interviews: Rorotoko (2016), Ulrik Ekman (Computational Culture, 2017).

Author (with links to related articles)
Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (6 MB)

Pascal Chabot: The Philosophy of Simondon: Between Technology and Individuation (2003/2013) [FR, EN]

3 October 2013, dusan

“The last two decades have seen a massive increase in the scholarly interest in technology, and have provoked new lines of thought in philosophy, sociology and cultural studies. Gilbert Simondon (1924 – 1989) was one of Frances’s most influential philosophers in this field, and an important influence on the work of Gilles Deleuze and Bernard Stiegler. His work is only now being translated into English. Chabot’s introduction to Simondon’s work was published in French in 2002 and is now available in English for the first time. It is the most accessible guide to Simondon’s important but often opaque work. Chabot provides an excellent introduction to Simondon, positioning him as a philosopher of technology, and he describes his theory of individuation including his crystalline ontology. He goes on to offer a bridge between these two concerns, exploring how they are related.”

French edition
Publisher Vrin, 2003
ISBN 9782711616008
160 pages

English edition
Translated by Aliza Krefetz with the participation of Graeme Kirkpatrick
Publisher Bloomsbury Academic, 2013
ISBN 1780930976, 9781780930978
156 pages
via thuihux

Review: Aud Sissel Hoel (Phil & Technology, EN)

Publisher (FR)
Publisher (EN)

La philosophie de Simondon (French, no OCR)
The Philosophy of Simondon (English)

Bernard Stiegler: Acting Out (2009)

20 January 2011, dusan

Acting Out is the first appearance in English of two short books published by Bernard Stiegler in 2003. In How I Became a Philosopher, he outlines his transformation during a five-year period of incarceration for armed robbery. Isolated from what had been his world, Stiegler began to conduct a kind of experiment in phenomenological research. Inspired by the Greek stoic Epictetus, Stiegler began to read, write, and discover his vocation, eventually studying philosophy in correspondence with Gérard Granel who was an important influence on a number of French philosophers, including Jacques Derrida, who was later Stiegler’s teacher.

The second book, To Love, To Love Me, To Love Us, is a powerful distillation of Stiegler’s analysis of the contemporary world. He maintains that a growing loss of a sense of individual and collective existence leads to a decreased ability to love oneself, and, by extension, others. This predicament is viewed through a tragic event: in 2002, in Nanterre, France, Richard Durn, a local activist, stormed the city’s town hall, shooting and killing eight people. Durn committed suicide the following day. The later publication of Durn’s his journal revealed a man struggling with the feeling that he did not exist, for which he tried to compensate by committing an atrocity. For Stiegler, this exemplifies how love of self becomes pathological: a “me” assassinates an “us” with which it cannot identify.

How I Became a Philosopher was originally published in French in 2003 under the title Passer al’acte.
To love, to love me, to love us was originally published in French in 2003 under the title Aimer, s’aimer, nous aimer.
Translated by David Barison, Daniel Ross, and Patrick Crogan
Publisher Stanford University Press, Stanford, California, 2009
Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics series
ISBN 0804758697, 9780804758697
93 pages

publisher
google books

PDF (updated on 2012-7-19)